Category Archives: Vermiculite

Southern Exposure Comes Through

Open BoxI mentioned in an earlier post that my order of sweet potato slips never arrived. I had gotten the impression, from the seed company confirmation email, that they had been shipped. Apparently, this was incorrect. On Tuesday another email arrived:

Subject: Sweet Potato Order Update Southern Exposure Seed Exchange
Your sweet potatoes have shipped today 6/4. They should arrive in 2-3 days.
Sweet potatoes should be planted quickly. If you’re not prepared to plant, place slips loosely in a flat of soil. They can be revived upon arrival by dipping in water or placing bottom half of slip in a cup of water.
You should expect the plants to look wilted after their long journey!

BowlsThey arrived on Thursday evening – and I was not ready. I opened the shipping box and placed the root ends in a couple of bowls full of moist vermiculite. I figured that would hold them till Saturday. As you can see they weren’t kidding about the wilting.

One reason (excuse) for my lack of preparation was named Andrea. This tropical storm sideswiped our area from late Wednesday to late Thursday – bringing heavy rains and strong winds. Between the two days I got over 4 inches of rain.

Saturday morning I was up bright and early to clean up from the storm. It was well past noon before I had all of the yard debris – mostly oak branches – raked up and shredded. While I was at it I mowed the lawn. The rain did wonders for my grass.

Okra CardboardAndrea’s winds had shifted the cardboard mulch on the okra bed, covering some of the plants. I stripped it off and noticed that more seeds had germinated underneath. Apparently the rain had washed them to new locations far from the holes that I had punched. The germination rate was better than I had first thought.

After a break for lunch I went grocery shopping. As a side note, Cornell University has just done a study proving that you should never go shopping when you’re hungry. I stumbled across this article on the Telegraph website. Don’t these people have anything better to do? My mom taught me this fifty years ago!

BuffyI began preparing the new garden bed about 3 PM, spacing the Beauregard slips 12 inches apart and the purple slips 24 inches apart.

VermiculiteI modified my planting technique this time (gardening is an art, not a science). In a 5 gallon bucket I mixed a couple of gallons of vermiculite with about a gallon of worm castings (measured by eye). I then dumped about a quart of the mix in each spot where I was going to plant. Using my hands I stirred this into the dirt along with a couple of cups of chlorine-free water, making a nice mud hole for each of my plants. Since we had just gotten 4 inches of rain the soil still had a vague hint of moisture. Talk about extremely well-drained! By the way, I purchase my vermiculite locally in 4 cubic foot (about 30 gallon) bags. An 8-quart (2 gallon) bag sells for about five dollars. The 30 gallon bag is about thirty-five dollars. It’s very convenient to have large quantities on hand whenever needed.

PlantedTwo of the slips didn’t look very good—one of each variety. Maybe they’ll survive.

I finished up about five o’clock. It began raining—a nice, steady downpour—about 5:30.

Having completed the planting, I decided to read the instructions that came with the shipment (it’s a guy thing). It was generic info that recommended a spacing of 9 to 18 inches. Close enough. It also recommended that I “transplant in the evening and water immediately.” Under the brutal Florida sunshine this is excellent advice.

As you can see from the date of this post I was too tired and sore to do any writing on Saturday evening. I retired early. The rain was still falling.